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Democratic Party has failed you, Trump tells black voters

Posted: Friday, August 19, 2016 | Billy Davis and Steve Jordahl, OneNewsNow.com | Politics

Donald Trump is making a direct appeal to black voters and one prominent black leader is advising him to be specific with the voters he's courting.

Trump's campaign policies "need to touch on education, the rehabilitation of non-violent offenders, and specific plans to empower businesses in urban areas," advises Bishop Harry Jackson of Hope Connection.

Jackson, who sits on Trump's board of evangelical advisors, tells OneNewsNow he has personally given that advice to the GOP presidential nominee.

The black vote is historically a reliable blocking block for the Democratic Party. 2012 was no exception, since 93 percent of blacks who voted chose to keep the country's first black president in the White House.

It's not a new idea for Republicans to court blacks with the conservative message of economic freedom and self-reliance – and the reminder that black unemployment under Obama is in double digits for black Americans.

The "real unemployment rate" for young blacks is 51 percent, Sen. Bernie Sanders said just a month ago, a claim that Politifact.com reluctantly admitted was "Mostly True."  

The Democratic Party, meanwhile, vilifies Republicans as greedy, out-of-touch rich whites who want to put blacks back in chains.

With that political backdrop, Trump travelled to Wisconsin this week after the weekend shooting of an armed black suspect and a night of riots in Milwaukee.

"The Democratic Party has failed and betrayed the African-American community," Trump said in a speech that waspraised by columnist Charles Krauthammer, a respected political observer and frequent critic of the GOP nominee.  

Democratic policies on crime, education and economics, Trump said, "have produced only more crime, more broken homes and more poverty."

Bill Owens, a black pastor in Memphis, says it was President Lyndon Johnson who succeeded in making the black community a permanent underclass. That is a reference to the so-called War on Poverty (see video above) declared by Johnson in 1964.  

"They had a hundred thousand federal workers to go throughout the country and talk black women into getting on welfare and food stamps," Owen recalls. "But that father could not be in the home. So they destroyed the black family."

Almost three out of four black children are born out of wedlock, which often means an absentee father. 

"I'm asking for the vote of every African-American citizen struggling in our country today," Trump said, "who wants a different and much better future."

This article first appeared on OneNewsNow.com.